boxed
color
#d9d9d9
https://canaim.ca/wp-content/themes/smartbox-installable/
https://canaim.ca/
#26ade4
style2
Developing novel methods to study drug safety and effectiveness
514.934.1934 ext.44844
McGill University Health Centre
Abstract

Objective

The Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) is a 2006 Canadian federal policy of income supplementation that provides parents with $100 monthly in Canadian dollars for each child aged < 6 years. The study main objective was to estimate the causal effect of UCCB on self-reported food insecurity overall and in vulnerable subgroups.

Method

The Canadian Community Health Survey (2001–2009) was used to conduct a difference-in-differences (DID) regression analysis for the effect of the UCCB on self-reported food insecurity. Respondents were ages ≥ 12 in families with at least one child aged < 6 years (UCCB-eligible, n = 22,737) or a child aged 6–11 but no child < 6 years (control group, n = 17,664).

Results

Over the study period 16.3% of respondents experienced some level of food insecurity. Overall, UCCB reduced the proportion of respondents reporting food insecurity by 2.4% (95% CI: − 4.0%, − 0.9%). There was a significantly stronger impact on food insecurity for respondents from households with yearly income below the population median (− 4.3%, 95% CI: − 7.2%, − 1.4%) and respondents from single parent families (− 5.4%, 95% CI: − 10.3%, − 0.6%).

Conclusion

We found that a relatively small monthly income supplementation results in a significant reduction in food insecurity at the population level, with larger effects in vulnerable groups.
_3
File Size47.3 KiB
DateNovember 25, 2015
Downloads475
AuthorRaluca Ionescu-Ittua, M Maria Glymour, Jay S Kaufman
scroll
Loading posts...
magnifier
#6E787E
on
fadeInUp
loading
#6E787E
on
Back